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ANTIBIOTIC-FREE FOOD

Agriculture is the greatest consumer of antibiotics in the world, but consumers are pushing for antibiotic-free meat.

 

Though still a niche in the food market, increasing consumer awareness especially in the US and Europe is – in some places supported by government – paving the way for a growing market in antibiotic-free food. In China and India, use of antibiotics is expected to rise, but a growing concern over environmental and health issues can create a drive for greater demand for antibiotic-free food.

Estimates suggest that up to 80 percent of the antibiotics sold in the US are used in agriculture, and globally the use of antibiotics in agriculture is estimated to increase by 67 percent between 2010 and 2030. Much of the increase is expected in China, India, and other growing economies where a booming middle class will raise demand for meat. Antibiotics are used in agriculture to not only treat illness in animals but also to make animals grow faster and to prevent illnesses that occur frequently under unhealthy growth conditions.

A NEW MARKET EMERGING
Supermarkets are starting to develop policies and positions on the use of antibiotics in the meat they source. Some are already offering several kinds of antibiotic-free meat to customers; others have made clear position statements while others are only just starting the conversation internally on this rising sustainability issue.

In the US, antibiotic free meat is still a niche of approxi- mately just 5 percent of the sales, but it is growing fast in an otherwise shrinking market. Especially sales of antibiotic-free chicken are booming, with 34 percent growth in 2014. A number of fast food chains have committed to serving antibiotic-free chicken meals within a few years and digital tools already exist to guide consumers to restaurants offering antibiotic-free meals.

A recent World Health Organization (WHO) global action plan to combat antibiotic resistance will further raise awareness of this opportunity by requiring all countries to develop national action plans. Bringing down the overuse of antibiotics in agriculture will be an important milestone in many of these national plans, which means less antibiotics leak into the environment from farms.

A GLOBAL GOLD STANDARD
In all, the growing consumer demand for antibiotic-free food combined with political pressure for reducing the use of antibiotics represents a unique challenge and opportunity for the entire meat value chain. Antibiotic-free chicken production is the lowest hanging fruit in the antibiotic free meat market. Short production cycles make disease control in chicken production less complicated than for other forms of livestock. For other meat products, fully eliminating the use of antibiotics is more complicated. However, pilot projects to test production methodologies and market potential are starting to appear.

The development of a new set of global standards to certify meat products produced without or with responsible use of antibiotics will further fuel this opportunity. Clear labels of ‘raised without antibiotics’ or meat produced with ‘responsible use of antibiotics’, will give consumers the tools to shop antibiotic-free meat more confidently. Less antibiotics on our farms means fewer resistant bacteria in our surroundings.

Key Numbers

99

percent drop in antimicrobial use in aquaculture in Norway bewteen 1987-2013 – 20 folds production increase.

76

percent of approved antibiotics for use in food production are categorized being medically important for human.

86

percent of consumers want ‘antibiotic-free’ meat at their local grocery store and more than
60% are willing to pay more for it.

Solutions for this Opportunity

ANTIBIOTIC FREE MENU

Subway will start serving antibiotic-free chicken and turkey at its U.S. restaurants, and are planning a complete stop.
Location: USA See this solution

MAKING THE ANTIBIOTIC FREE THE NEW STANDARD

Perdue has completely removed all antibiotics from its hatchery.
Location:USA See this solution

REPLACING ANTIBIOTICS WITH VACCINES

Norwegian Veterinary Institute has vaccines to replace antibiotics in farmed salmon.
Location: Norway See this solution

AIMING AT ANTIBIOTIC FREE SALMON PRODUCTION

Nova Austral aims to achieve antibiotic-free salmon production.
Location: Chile See this solution

BANNING ANTIBIOTICS

California has become the first American state to outlaw routine use of bacteria fighting drugs in livestock.
Location: USA See this solution

LARGE SCALE ANTIBIOTIC FREE POULTRY PRODUCTION

Korin was the first company in Brazil to establish a large scale production of antibiotic-free poultry production.
Location: Brazil See this solution

PILOTING ANTIBIOTIC FREE MEAT PRODUCTION

Danish Crown is running pilot projects on farms experimenting with the production of antibiotics free meat.
Location: Denmark See this solution

ANTIBIOTIC FREE POULTRY IS GOOD BUSINESS

Sales by Carrefour of antibiotic-free chickens is four times better than budgeted.
Location: France See this solution



SURVEY FINDINGS

A GENDER DIVIDER – MUCH MORE APPEALING TO WOMEN

Antibiotic-free food is a relatively new phenomenon. It currently accounts for a small segment of the overall meat market but the demand is increasing. It is expected that most countries will develop national action plans to combat antibiotic resistance that can be expected to influence the future demand for antibiotic-free food.

ASIA SEES OPPORTUNITIES

Antibiotic free food is an opportunity favoured by the Other Asia region to address the risk of losing lifesaving medicine. It is the second most favoured opportunity in the region point- ing to possibilities for pursuing new business in this emerging market space. Globally, the nance sector is the most positive of all business sectors. Among all business sectors surveyed, it is the manufacturing sector which perceives to be most affected by this opportunity when compared to the other presented opportunities. However, manufacturing along with the other business sectors have not responded more positively towards pursuing this opportunity over others. This could imply that the opportunity is not mature enough for mainstream business. Growing demand from consumers and maturation of the concept could boost this opportunity’s capacity to attract the interest of business sectors.

LOW CAPACITY STANDS IN THE WAY

MENA stands out as a region that neither sees societal benefit nor has the capacity to pursue the opportunity of antibiotic-free food. The low capacity is mainly explained by a very low degree of perceived political will power in the region on this issue. Likewise, for North America, political will power, as a capacity factor, scores relatively low which results in an overall capacity score lower than some of the other regions. Europe also rates the capacity to pursue antibiotic free food relatively low and mainly due to relatively low scores on economic capacity and political will power. Shifting from current production methods in Europe to antibiotic-free opportunity livestock production will mean lower productivity pushing up production costs, which may explain the perceived low levels of economic capacity to pursue this opportunity. At a general level looking at the overall ranking of the opportunities, antibiotic-free food is perceived to be good for society but there seems to be capacity gaps in pursuing it. The data points to the fact that both civil society and business are likely to advocate for this opportunity, which may count in favour of building powerful alliances in making a change happen.

NUMBER 6 ON THE OPPORTUNITY RANKING

Regenerative Ocean Economy_Ranking

THE ECONOMIC CAPACITY, TECHNOLOGICAL CAPACITY, AND THE POLITICAL WILL POWER TO PURSUE THIS OPPORTUNITY ACROSS NINE REGIONS

Capacity to puruse_Regenerative Ocean

BENEFITS AND CAPACITY

Perceived benefits from pursuing this opportunity (x), and capacity to do so (y), World and geographic regions. Scale goes from -10 to +10.

GOR_SocietyCapacity_Regenerative Ocean Economy


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