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REDUCE FOOD WASTE

We can feed an additional 3 billion people if we stop wasting food. Stakeholders along the food value chain can benefit economically from reducing waste, which opens opportunities for innovation all the way from soil to stomach

 

Saving one-fourth of the food currently wasted is enough to feed all the hungry people in the world. From our farms to grocery stores to dinner tables, much of the food we grow is never eaten. Reducing food waste is an opportunity to innovate along the value chain.

REDUCING POST HARVEST FOOD LOSS
Just after harvest, food is mainly lost because of lack of proper storage and distribution practices. This is true in both low-, middle- and high-income countries, but most severe in low-income countries. A recent survey by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 30-40 percent of total food production in developing economies is lost before it reaches the market. Recent technical advances in mobile refrigeration – e.g. solar power – raise the opportunity to create a ‘clean cold revolution’ that harnesses renewable energy to fix the broken cold chains by adding refrigeration capacity where it is missing. Not only offering to save food, it can also reduce the footprint of the current refrigeration systems by upgrading under-performing units in cold chains that have insufficient capacity or are not energy efficient.

By ‘greening the cold chain’, we reduce food loss, feed more people and substantially reduce the carbon footprint of the food industry. Furthermore, reducing waste will also free up other resources since it is not just the food itself that is lost; it is also the water, human effort and resources that go into production. Helping families in off-grid communities to ‘keep it cool’ calls for especially innovative low tech – high impact solutions.

Reducing food waste via improved cold chains benefits everyone. Food producers benefit from greater efficiency in being able to sell closer to 100 percent of the food they produce. Food retailers benefit from a more stable supply of food and they can ensure the food they receive can be stored and sold fresh while enjoying savings from new energy-efficient refrigeration.

REDUCING FOOD WASTE AT POINT OF CONSUMPTION
After making it to supermarkets and into our homes, food spoils and is eventually wasted. A variety of tools and systems can stop this waste. This includes innovations in packaging and incentivising consumers and retailers to sell and purchase more responsibly with respect to reducing food waste.

In high and very-high HDI countries, most food is wasted by consumers or from distribution and market practices that discard much food. This happens because the food might not look or feel as consumers prefer it to, or because of stringent regulation. This results in large amounts of waste. In Europe and North America, food waste per person is more than 10 times greater than in South America and South East Asia.

Changing consumer behaviour can be arduous. While innovations like smart labelling – that allows products to stay on the shelf as long as they are fresh – can help. There is plenty of room for innovations that can change irresponsible consumer behaviour and incentivize retailers to adopt less wasteful practices.

Reducing food loss in early stages of food production when combined with measures to reduce food waste at the retail and consumer level, can have a significant impact on addressing food scarcity and reducing the CO2 footprint of the food industry.

Key Numbers

40

Million US Dollars annual saving for just 1% reduction in post-harvest losses in Sub-Saharan Africa.

750

Bilion US Dollars worth of food is lost globally each year – equivalent to the GDP of Switzerland.

6.7

Billion US Dollars worth fruits and vegetables can be saved in India by effective cooling technology.

Solutions for this Opportunity

MAKING UGLY PRODUCTS ATTRACTIVE

Supermarket chain Intermarché reduces cosmetic food waste by selling misshapen fruits and vegetables at reduced prices.
Location: France See this solution

TURNING COFFEE FRUIT INTO FLOUR

Integrated with wireless sensors, CropX’s software service boosts crop yield and saves water and energy.
Location: Nicaragua, Guatemala, Mexico, Hawaii and Vietnam See this solution

SAVING BUFFET FOOD

“Too Good To Go” is an online network of buffet restaurants willing to sell their excess food cheaply before closing.
Location: Denmark See this solution

SMALLER BUFFET-PLATES

The Hotel Union Geiranger has introduced smaller buffet-plates resulting in substantial reductions in food waste.
Location: Norway See this solution

SOLAR-POWERED COLD STORAGE

ColdHubs are walk-in, solar-powered cold stations for 24/7 storage and preservation of perishable food.
Location: Nigeria See this solution

DISTRIBUTING EXCESS FOOD

Through the “Not to Waste Food” programme, hotels and restaurants in Egypt go together to distribute excess food to the poorest.
Location: Egypt See this solution

LOW-TECH EVAPORATION COOLING

Mitticool’s clay refrigerator runs without electricity, serving as an affordable cooling alternative for rural communities.
Location: Global See this solution

COOLING-FREE FOOD PRESERVATION

The Wakati tent produces a sterilized microclimate that keeps produce fresh for a week without refrigeration.
Location: Global See this solution



SURVEY FINDINGS

A MENA FAVOURITE AND POPULAR AMONG YOUNG RESPONDENTS

The perception of waste as a resource is maturing in many populations around the globe. It is both an ethical issue that we live in a world where food is wasted while an alarming number of people go to bed hungry every day, as well as a question of misuse of resources.

FOOD FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

Wasting less food is good for our societies in the eyes of most respondents. To reduce food waste is the second best of the food related opportunities – just behind smart farming. It is among the top four of all opportunities – assessed for the potential impact on society and capacity to pursue across all regions. Assessed for the potential impact on society, reduce food waste is the second top ranked opportunity, just after “Smart Farming” – putting two food related opportunities in the very top in terms of perceived positive impact on society.

It is on the top of the’ to do’ list for the MENA region where it is the most preferred opportunity of all 15. It is also one of the most favoured opportunities in North America and Europe. In South America, the opportunity is also perceived to have high benefits for society, but there is low faith in the political will power to pursue it.

FINANCE SECTOR AND YOUTH ARE THE OPTIMISTS

The finance sector seems to be the only business sector which is more likely to seek business opportunities in reducing food waste. It is not perceived to be a top opportunity in the eyes of the governmental sector, as the sector rates it low in terms of both benefits for society and capacity to pursue.

Respondents below the age of 30 perceive this opportunity to be the second runner up after the digital labour market. The higher the age of the respondents, the lower perceived positive impact on society of the reduction of food waste.

NUMBER 4 ON THE OPPORTUNITY RANKING

Reduce Food Waste_Ranking

THE ECONOMIC CAPACITY, TECHNOLOGICAL CAPACITY, AND THE POLITICAL WILL POWER TO PURSUE THIS OPPORTUNITY ACROSS NINE REGIONS

Capacity to pursue_Reduce Food Waste

BENEFITS AND CAPACITY

Perceived benefits from pursuing this opportunity (x), and capacity to do so (y), World and geographic regions. Scale goes from -10 to +10.

GOR_SocietyCapacity_Reduce Food Waste


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